Tag Archives: seeing the world through others’ eyes

Creating Knowledge Together – Part 3:  Using A “Focus Group Class” in Any Course

In Part 2, I described how my interest in improving dispute resolution theory led to the development of the Stone Soup Project.  This part describes how my interest in improving legal education relates to this project.  It suggests ways that faculty can be creative in incorporating more of the real world into their teaching, particularly … Continue reading Creating Knowledge Together – Part 3:  Using A “Focus Group Class” in Any Course

Diversity and Dispute Resolution

I am a member of David Hoffman’s huge fan club for the many reasons that the club is so large.  One of these reasons is that he uses his caring and deliberate approach to address critically important issues in our field.  Despite serious efforts by many people in our field for a long time, we … Continue reading Diversity and Dispute Resolution

Fascinating Simulation of Political Mediation in Scotland

I just read this blog post by John Sturrock, a preeminent Scottish mediator who has long worked to mediate political conflicts involving Scotland and the United Kingdom.  He was active before the recent referendum on Scottish independence and he has been working on issues related to “Brexit,” the withdrawal of the UK from the European … Continue reading Fascinating Simulation of Political Mediation in Scotland

Would You Like to Write a Guest Blog on Listening for Lawyers?

You may recall that Art wrote a post describing an excellent blog, Listen Like a Lawyer, curated by Emory Practice Professor Jennifer Romig.  This blog focuses on a skill that is critically important for all law students, faculty, and legal professionals. Jennifer would love to have people write short guest blogs coming out of the … Continue reading Would You Like to Write a Guest Blog on Listening for Lawyers?

Touching Story of Relationship of Constructive Engagement in Conflict

I think that one of our main missions in the DR field is to promote constructive engagement in conflict.  We know that conflict is inevitable and it can be constructive and/or destructive.  Often, when people are in conflict, it is very destructive and everyone just wants to end the conflict as quickly as possible while … Continue reading Touching Story of Relationship of Constructive Engagement in Conflict

What the World Needs Now

From TFOI Jackie Font-Guzmán: The Werner Institute and the 2040 Initiative at the Creighton University School of Law invite you to a symposium exploring how the 1967 U.S. Supreme Court decision of Loving v. Virginia has influenced society institutionally, demographically and relationally. The symposium, entitled 50 Years of Loving: Seeking Justice Through Love and Relationships, … Continue reading What the World Needs Now

Building Common Ground Between Bubbles – Part 5

On January 10, President Obama gave his farewell address, which dealt, in part, with building common ground between people divided across so many boundaries. Although some people obviously disagree with President Obama politically, hopefully most people would agree with the following ideas.  As I wrote previously, understanding and empathizing with others does not mean that … Continue reading Building Common Ground Between Bubbles – Part 5

Is Political Moderation a Virtue These Days?

“[E]xtremism in the defense of liberty is no vice!  And . . . moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue!”  So said Senator Barry Goldwater a half a century ago when he accepted the Republican nomination for president in 1964.  He lost that election in a landslide, so extremism apparently wasn’t such a … Continue reading Is Political Moderation a Virtue These Days?