Tag Archives: seeing the world through others’ eyes

In Praise of (Good) Disagreements

As they say, if two people always agree, one of them is unnecessary. It may seem odd that I advocate for more disagreements in a blog named Indisputably.  But that’s exactly what I’m doing.  Actually, just more good disagreements. Dying Art of Disagreement This post riffs on a column by New York Times columnist Bret Stephens, … Continue reading In Praise of (Good) Disagreements

Missouri Symposium on the First Amendment on Campus & Dispute Resolution

You are cordially invited to Missouri’s Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution Annual Symposium, to be held on Friday, Oct. 27, 2017, in Columbia, Missouri, on the topic “The First Amendment on Campus:  Identifying Best Practices for Managing and Resolving Disputes.”  Almost weekly, events on our nation’s campuses vividly demonstrate conflicting attitudes about the … Continue reading Missouri Symposium on the First Amendment on Campus & Dispute Resolution

How Can We Build Common Ground Between Bubbles?  – Revisited

Richard Barbieri, the general editor of ACResolutions, the quarterly magazine of the Association for Conflict Resolution, was struck by my series of posts after the November election about building common ground between “bubbles” in our society.  He asked me to combine them into a single article for publication in the next issue of the magazine, … Continue reading How Can We Build Common Ground Between Bubbles?  – Revisited

Invitation to Join Conversation About Conflict Engagement in a Divided Nation

From WFOI Noam Ebner: Friends, I’d like to share the link to a conversation developing on ADRHub, and invite you to join in. Initially a dialog between Bernie Mayer and Gail Bingham, this interaction is developing into an open conversation around a topic that is of deep concern to many of us.  Captioned ‘Conflict Intervention … Continue reading Invitation to Join Conversation About Conflict Engagement in a Divided Nation

Call for Short, Quick Article on Dispute Resolution and Political Polarization

From my colleague, S.I. Strong: The Journal of Dispute Resolution has just issued an expedited call for papers relating to a “virtual symposium”  that will be published in its next  issue.  One of the contributors has dropped out at the very last minute, leaving one slot open for a paper in the 10-15 page range (though slightly longer … Continue reading Call for Short, Quick Article on Dispute Resolution and Political Polarization

Stone Soup Mini-Course: Good Questions

In this mini-course so far, we have noted that qualitative research can be cool and insightful, learning can be more fun, and there are tons of things that you might want to know and you want your students to know. Today, we will consider how to frame questions to get the most valid possible information … Continue reading Stone Soup Mini-Course: Good Questions

Stone Soup Mini-Course: More About Macaulay’s Noncontractual Relations in Business Article

In the last post in this Stone Soup mini-course, I summarized Stewart Macaulay’s classic article using qualitative methods, Noncontractual Relations in Business.  This post elaborates. When I was a sociology grad student at Wisconsin, I got a chance to meet Stewart Macaulay, a really charming guy who was on the law school faculty.  I remember … Continue reading Stone Soup Mini-Course: More About Macaulay’s Noncontractual Relations in Business Article

Stone Soup Mini-Course: Cool Qualitative Research

The last lesson in the Stone Soup mini-course cautioned about having exaggerated confidence in quantitative research about dispute resolution.  This lesson is intended as an antidote to unwarranted skepticism about qualitative research by describing some examples of great qualitative research.  Both types of methods are valuable, especially when used in combination.  I focus particularly on … Continue reading Stone Soup Mini-Course: Cool Qualitative Research