Tag Archives: seeing the world through others’ eyes

Call for Short, Quick Article on Dispute Resolution and Political Polarization

From my colleague, S.I. Strong: The Journal of Dispute Resolution has just issued an expedited call for papers relating to a “virtual symposium”  that will be published in its next  issue.  One of the contributors has dropped out at the very last minute, leaving one slot open for a paper in the 10-15 page range (though slightly longer … Continue reading Call for Short, Quick Article on Dispute Resolution and Political Polarization

Stone Soup Mini-Course: Good Questions

In this mini-course so far, we have noted that qualitative research can be cool and insightful, learning can be more fun, and there are tons of things that you might want to know and you want your students to know. Today, we will consider how to frame questions to get the most valid possible information … Continue reading Stone Soup Mini-Course: Good Questions

Stone Soup Mini-Course: More About Macaulay’s Noncontractual Relations in Business Article

In the last post in this Stone Soup mini-course, I summarized Stewart Macaulay’s classic article using qualitative methods, Noncontractual Relations in Business.  This post elaborates. When I was a sociology grad student at Wisconsin, I got a chance to meet Stewart Macaulay, a really charming guy who was on the law school faculty.  I remember … Continue reading Stone Soup Mini-Course: More About Macaulay’s Noncontractual Relations in Business Article

Stone Soup Mini-Course: Cool Qualitative Research

The last lesson in the Stone Soup mini-course cautioned about having exaggerated confidence in quantitative research about dispute resolution.  This lesson is intended as an antidote to unwarranted skepticism about qualitative research by describing some examples of great qualitative research.  Both types of methods are valuable, especially when used in combination.  I focus particularly on … Continue reading Stone Soup Mini-Course: Cool Qualitative Research

Creating Knowledge Together, Part 3:  Using A “Focus Group Class” in Any Course

In Part 2, I described how my interest in improving dispute resolution theory led to the development of the Stone Soup Project.  This part describes how my interest in improving legal education relates to this project.  It suggests ways that faculty can be creative in incorporating more of the real world into their teaching, particularly … Continue reading Creating Knowledge Together, Part 3:  Using A “Focus Group Class” in Any Course

Diversity and Dispute Resolution

I am a member of David Hoffman’s huge fan club for the many reasons that the club is so large.  One of these reasons is that he uses his caring and deliberate approach to address critically important issues in our field.  Despite serious efforts by many people in our field for a long time, we … Continue reading Diversity and Dispute Resolution

Fascinating Simulation of Political Mediation in Scotland

I just read this blog post by John Sturrock, a preeminent Scottish mediator who has long worked to mediate political conflicts involving Scotland and the United Kingdom.  He was active before the recent referendum on Scottish independence and he has been working on issues related to “Brexit,” the withdrawal of the UK from the European … Continue reading Fascinating Simulation of Political Mediation in Scotland

Would You Like to Write a Guest Blog on Listening for Lawyers?

You may recall that Art wrote a post describing an excellent blog, Listen Like a Lawyer, curated by Emory Practice Professor Jennifer Romig.  This blog focuses on a skill that is critically important for all law students, faculty, and legal professionals. Jennifer would love to have people write short guest blogs coming out of the … Continue reading Would You Like to Write a Guest Blog on Listening for Lawyers?