Tag Archives: business DR

Three Easy Pieces

This post channels 60% of Jack Nicholson but without the chicken salad sandwich. It describes three short pieces that you might want to use in courses or continuing education programs. Overcoming Roadblocks to Settlement The first is an article entitled Overcoming Roadblocks to Reaching Settlement in Family Law Cases published in Family Advocate, the magazine … Continue reading Three Easy Pieces

George J. Siedel: Are Negotiators Subject To Liability For Using Their BATNA Power?

From George J. Seidel, Williamson Family Professor of Business Administration and Thurnau Professor of Business Law at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business: Many thanks to John Lande, Hiro Aragaki, and Sanda Kaufman for their recent posts that have clarified the meaning of “BATNA.”  BATNA is an important concept because it is often a … Continue reading George J. Siedel: Are Negotiators Subject To Liability For Using Their BATNA Power?

CFPB Arbitration Rule Overturned

From my colleague, Amy Schmitz: This summer, I reported the news that after much study, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) had issued its arbitration rule barring the use of arbitration clauses to preclude class actions with respect to financial services and contracts disputes.  The rule would have prohibited banks and other consumer financial companies … Continue reading CFPB Arbitration Rule Overturned

Stone Soup Mini-Course: More About Macaulay’s Noncontractual Relations in Business Article

In the last post in this Stone Soup mini-course, I summarized Stewart Macaulay’s classic article using qualitative methods, Noncontractual Relations in Business.  This post elaborates. When I was a sociology grad student at Wisconsin, I got a chance to meet Stewart Macaulay, a really charming guy who was on the law school faculty.  I remember … Continue reading Stone Soup Mini-Course: More About Macaulay’s Noncontractual Relations in Business Article

Why Don’t People Complain? Implications for Defense Counsel. And Some Practical Ethics Hypos for Students.

The presidential election campaign this year has provided several teachable moments for law students and lawyers and this post focuses on one of them. Unless you have been hibernating for the past few weeks, you know that a number of women have accused Republican candidate Donald J. Trump of sexual misconduct.  Mr. Trump and his … Continue reading Why Don’t People Complain? Implications for Defense Counsel. And Some Practical Ethics Hypos for Students.

How to Reach “Level Two Maturity” in Handling Civil Disputes

In June, John Kiernan gave a talk in which he argued that the ADR field has reached a first level of maturity but “ADR remains far short of its full, what might be called ‘level two maturity.’”  He gave the talk at a luncheon of Association for Conflict Resolution of Greater New York, where he … Continue reading How to Reach “Level Two Maturity” in Handling Civil Disputes

Review of Best-Selling Negotiation Text

This seems like an appropriate time to review that best-selling negotiation guide written in the 1980s. I refer, of course, to The Art of the Deal by Donald J. Trump.  (What – you were expecting Getting to Yes?) The leading presidential candidates from both major political parties have a lot of professional negotiation experience and … Continue reading Review of Best-Selling Negotiation Text

A No-Brainer?

One might assume that using a “planned early dispute resolution” (PEDR) system should be a “no-brainer” for businesses that regularly litigate because litigation-as-usual undermines many business interests such as efficiency, protection of reputations and relationships, control of disputing and business operations generally, and risk management, among others. Although this seems like a plausible assumption, the … Continue reading A No-Brainer?