All posts by John Lande

Want a Smarter Group? Add More Women

That’s one of the conclusions in an op-ed in the New York Times today.  Researchers Anita Woolley, Thomas W. Malone, and Christopher Chabris did a series of studies finding that the “smartest” teams (measured by performance in logical analysis, brainstorming, coordination, planning and moral reasoning) were distinguished by three characteristics. First, their members contributed more … Continue reading Want a Smarter Group? Add More Women

What is (A)DR About?

Does ADR include trials? I know, I know. This sounds like another one of my dumb questions. Although I have a pretty broad conception of DR, my initial reaction was that trial is one of the few procedures I would exclude from DR. As described below, on reflection, I probably would include trials. More importantly, … Continue reading What is (A)DR About?

Student Writing Competition About Ferguson and Related Events

My colleague, S.I. Strong, is coordinating a student writing competition about the events in Ferguson as follows: The University of Missouri is sponsoring a student writing competition analyzing the events in Ferguson (and elsewhere) from a dispute resolution / conflicts resolution perspective, as described on the competition website.  The deadline is relatively soon — February … Continue reading Student Writing Competition About Ferguson and Related Events

Strong UNCITRAL Study Cited by United Nations

My colleague, Professor S.I. Strong, recently conducted a large-scale empirical study on the use and perception of international commercial mediation and conciliation that appears to be the first of its kind. The information was gathered to assist the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) as it considers a proposal from the Government of … Continue reading Strong UNCITRAL Study Cited by United Nations

Is Legal Education a Zombie?

Lately, we have talked about Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella, Prince Charming, fairy godmothers, aristocrats, wicked witches, mutant children, beasts, step-sisters, cooks, doctors, firefighters, and boy scouts. (Note several different links.)  Now zombies, black holes, frogs, and more junior royalty.   My colleague, Rafael Gely, recently sent an email to folks in our Center about the work … Continue reading Is Legal Education a Zombie?

Some Good Questions

In 1998, commenting on the hot controversy about the “Rand Report’s” finding that certain mediation programs did not save time or money (measured in terms of lawyers’ work hours), Professor Craig McEwen argued that it was the wrong question to ask whether “mediation works.” Critics of the Report had argued that its methodology led to … Continue reading Some Good Questions

Some Puffing Sucks . . . But Developing Good Relationships Is More Likely to be Effective than a New Rule

“Oh Boy! A fight.” That’s often what I say in class when students vigorously disagree. I like these “fights” because they usually lead to helpful discussions that clarify differing views.   So when Andrea wrote her post, Puffing Sucks, I thought, “Oh Boy! A fight.”   She argues that puffing is “[l]ying, through and through,” … Continue reading Some Puffing Sucks . . . But Developing Good Relationships Is More Likely to be Effective than a New Rule

Resources about the FRCP and Legal Education

I am one of several people on the LEAPS committee who scans certain blogs to identify people who may not be familiar with LEAPS and let them know about it. So I subscribe to the Best Practices for Legal Education blog and the blog for IAALS, the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal … Continue reading Resources about the FRCP and Legal Education